CCM RBZ Superfast Review

Posted by Ian Tang on Aug 22, 2014

CCM established a partnership with Taylor Made in 2012 when the RBZ was released. The aim of the new partnership was to combine the technology of CCM’s ice hockey sticks with the expertise of Taylor Made’s line of golf drivers. Of course, CCM strives to emphasize the shooting aspect of the player’s game with their blade technology and custom kick point.

Taylor Made’s success is a result of the company’s focus to improve the coefficient to restitution, or C.O.R. The idea is that the less time the puck stays in contact with a loaded stick, the quicker the shot. While most of the elite-model sticks contain foam in the blade of the stick, the blade of the performance RBZ sticks do not. Through testing, CCM has determined that the hollow blade makes the stick lighter and more responsive to shooting. The Speed Pocket technology improves upon the success of the previous RBZ sticks by creating a pocket for energy instead of channels. Without the channels, the Superfast has been found to give 50% more C.O.R. than the RBZ Stage 2.

Another technology that plays a large role in maximizing shot power is the RBZ’s custom kick point. All of the RBZ sticks improve the shooting advantage by allowing the shaft to flex wherever the shooter’s bottom hand is placed. This means that snap shots will create a flex point higher up on the shaft, while slap shots receive a lower kick point on the shaft during slap shots. Players benefit from this because it allows the shooter to effectively release the puck at times when they would normally have to adjust their hands. Whether it is a quick chip in front of the net, or a quick shot to get rid of the puck, the custom kick point gives a little more power in situations where the player is not able to set up for the shot.

Player Review

I have had the pleasure of using this stick for about a month and experienced a lot of the advantages written above. I own a RBZ stage one and it continues to be one of the most powerful sticks that I have used for shooting. This is the first stick that I have used that never seemed to lose its pop. However, this may be because I tend to use sticks with foam in the blade, unlike the Superfast. Similar to the original, the Superfast feels heavier than many of the top-of-the-line sticks. The Speed Pocket blade releases the puck so quickly that I had to adjust the way I shoot. By releasing the puck more quickly than with an MX3, I was able to feel the stick’s shooting potential.

CCM’s Speed Pocket isn’t the only unique technology provided by the Superfast. I value CCM’s custom kick point more than any other feature in the RBZ line. Shooters can benefit from this innovation because it doesn’t matter whether you prefer a low kick stick or a mid-flex. Every shot will cause the shaft to flex where the lower hand is placed instead of a fixed position. Players that prefer taking snap shots can have a high-flex point, as well as all the benefits of the Speed Pocket technology. The same goes defensemen with heavy slap shots. I feel the stick flex at a lower point along the shaft when winding up at the point.

Since having the Superfast in my possession, I have played very rough with it. One of the most impressive characteristics of the stick is that it still shoots just as well as it did when I first purchased it. After months of shooting and grinding in the corners, the stick showed no major signs of wear. Check out the review video when I had the pleasure of launching shots with the Superfast!



-The shaft feels thicker and rounder than most competitors. It may be more difficult to grip.

-May have difficulty feeling puck placement along the blade.

-Heavier than some of the competition.


1 Comment for “CCM RBZ Superfast Review”

Tim Lucas on Jan 29, 2016

My son who is 12 uses a superfast and loves it, the only problem I have with it is that the toe of the blade is slowly deteriorating even tho we tape the perimeter of the blade.Another teammate of his has 2 superfast sticks and they both have the same problem. Is this a common problem with the ccm blades.

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